The Emerging Environmental Majority

Christina Larson at the Washington Monthly has an article that contains one of the best potted histories of American environmental movements (yes, plural) that I've seen lately. (She also explains why some of us reject the label environmentalist.) She traces the contribution of hunters, anglers, and foresters on the first wave of American environmental policies, … Continue reading The Emerging Environmental Majority

Toyotas (and Fords) 600 times more dangerous than media reports

You are over 600 times more likely to die in an automobile fatality in ANY make of car than you are to die from Toyota's flawed acceleration system. Getting in a car is inherently dangerous because of the way we build our cities.

Social justice and reduced calcification in planktonic foraminifera

So, you may be asking yourself, what does reduced calcification in modern Southern Ocean planktonic foraminifera have to with social justice? Oceans are getting more acidic, not due to global warming, but due to increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. That's a problem for shell-forming organisms at the base of the ocean food chain.

Videophilia replacing love of nature

Loving nature, it turns out, is not just an instinct but a virtue. We must actively create, and re-create, every generation, a culture that loves, and therefore tends and keeps, God's garden.

Videophilia replacing love of nature

"We are raising a generation of young people whose primary experience with nature is virtual. Real nature is a full sensory experience, with frequent open-ended problem-solving opportunities and no off switch. We should all make outdoor play a priority for our children and ourselves."

Evangelicals get gold star for creation care

Martin Marty's piece on evangelicals and creation care is a combination of head-patting approval, finger-wagging for being tardy, tut-tutting about our evangelical hang-ups, and instrumental use of our creation care efforts to goad mainliners into action. Nothing lights a fire under Episcopalians and Unitarians on social issues like saying "Look, even the evangelicals are on board with this issue!"

Faithful Urbanism

"Living on the Streets" reviews the prospects for urban churches to play a significant role in urban revitalization....Churches can "1) grow community, 2) promote community service, 3) attract people to live downtown, 4) draw private investment, and 5) add beauty to the physical appearances of community...."