Mapping environmental injustice…

You can now listen to my talk about environmental justice and how it shows up on the landscape, from the Q Conference in Nashville back in April, as it's just been posted as a podcast. The video may be up next week, and I'll update this post with the link. In the talk I referred … Continue reading Mapping environmental injustice…

Overpopulation: The environmental problem that isn’t

The "problem of overpopulation" is taking care of itself. Public policy should focus more directly on the things that make people better off. Coercive population control is immoral, and other efforts at "regulating population" are less effective than helping families lead productive, rewarding, and flourishing lives.

Taking the Measure of the Real Economy

A healthy economy is a necessary but not sufficient condition for human flourishing. C.S. Lewis would call it a “second thing” rather than a “first thing”. A healthy economy should serve higher goals of justice, peace, compassion, and rest. In the same manner that Wendell Berry asked “What Are People For?” we should always ask, “what is the economy for?”

How many roads must a man walk down?

How many roads must a man walk down without sidewalks, crosswalks, adequate lighting, or bike lanes, before he realizes that his quality of life depends on the built environment? How we build our cities, and especially how we build our streets, determines an awful lot about how we live together.

Stimulus Funding for Public Transportation Takes the Concept of Paradox to a New Level

News stories out this week about the paradox (or irony--I always get confused) of stimulus funding for public transportation infrastructure projects, while local government budget shortfalls or short-sightedness is simultaneously leading to fare increases, service cuts, and job losses <http://t4america.org/transitcuts/&gt;. Many local governments have obstinately refused to raise public support for operating costs of public … Continue reading Stimulus Funding for Public Transportation Takes the Concept of Paradox to a New Level